Whitby Family Photographer

 

 

 

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Whitby Township (now the Town of Whitby) was named after the seaport town of Whitby, Yorkshire, England. In addition to Whitby, Yorkshire, the Town of Whitby is also officially twinned with LongueuilQuebec and FeldkirchAustria.

When the township was originally surveyed in 1792, the surveyor, from the northern part of England, named the townships east of Toronto after towns in northeastern England: York, Scarborough, Pickering, Whitby and Darlington.[2] The original name of “Whitby” is Danish, dating from about 867 AD when the Danes invaded Britain. It is a contraction of “Whitteby,” meaning “White Village.” The allusion may be to the white lighthouse on the pier at Whitby, Yorkshire, and also at Whitby, Ontario.’ Although settlement dates back to 1800, it was not until 1836 that a downtown business centre was established by Whitby’s founder Peter Perry.

Whitby’s chief asset was its fine natural harbour on Lake Ontario, from which grain from the farmland to the north was first shipped in 1833. In the 1840s a road was built from Whitby Harbour to Lake Simcoe and Georgian Bay, to bring trade and settlement through the harbour to and from the rich hinterland to the north. The Town of Whitby was chosen as the seat of government for the newly formed County of Ontario in 1852, and incorporated in 1855. The remainder of Whitby Township remained a separate municipality, although the eastern half surrounding Oshawa was incorporated as the new Township of East Whitby in 1857. In the 1870s a railway, the “Port Whitby and Port Perry Railway“, was constructed from Whitby harbour to Port Perry, and later extended to Lindsay as the “Whitby, Port Perry and Lindsay Railway.”

Whitby is also the site of Trafalgar Castle School, a private girls’ school founded in 1874. The building, constructed as an Elizabethan-style castle in 1859–62 as a private residence for the Sheriff of Ontario County, is a significant architectural landmark and Whitby’s only provincial historic site marked with a plaque. The school celebrated its 125th anniversary in 1999.

During the Second World War, Whitby was the location of Camp X, a secret spy training facility established by Sir William Stephenson, the “Man Called Intrepid”. Although the buildings have since been demolished, a monument was unveiled on the site of Camp X in 1984 by Ontario’s Lieutenant Governor John Black Aird. Following the War, Soviet dissenter Igor Gouzenko was taken to the facility with his wife to live in secretive protective custody after fleeing Ottawa, Ontario.[3]”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitby%2C_Ontario

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Whitby maternity session

 maternity session WhitbyAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerAjax maternity photographerAjax photographerWhitby Township (now the Town of Whitby) was named after the seaport town of Whitby, Yorkshire, England. In addition to Whitby, Yorkshire, the Town of Whitby is also officially twinned with LongueuilQuebec and FeldkirchAustria.

When the township was originally surveyed in 1792, the surveyor, from the northern part of England, named the townships east of Toronto after towns in northeastern England: York, Scarborough, Pickering, Whitby and Darlington.[2] The original name of “Whitby” is Danish, dating from about 867 AD when the Danes invaded Britain. It is a contraction of “Whitteby,” meaning “White Village.” The allusion may be to the white lighthouse on the pier at Whitby, Yorkshire, and also at Whitby, Ontario.’ Although settlement dates back to 1800, it was not until 1836 that a downtown business centre was established by Whitby’s founder Peter Perry.

Whitby’s chief asset was its fine natural harbour on Lake Ontario, from which grain from the farmland to the north was first shipped in 1833. In the 1840s a road was built from Whitby Harbour to Lake Simcoe and Georgian Bay, to bring trade and settlement through the harbour to and from the rich hinterland to the north. The Town of Whitby was chosen as the seat of government for the newly formed County of Ontario in 1852, and incorporated in 1855. The remainder of Whitby Township remained a separate municipality, although the eastern half surrounding Oshawa was incorporated as the new Township of East Whitby in 1857. In the 1870s a railway, the “Port Whitby and Port Perry Railway“, was constructed from Whitby harbour to Port Perry, and later extended to Lindsay as the “Whitby, Port Perry and Lindsay Railway.”

Whitby is also the site of Trafalgar Castle School, a private girls’ school founded in 1874. The building, constructed as an Elizabethan-style castle in 1859–62 as a private residence for the Sheriff of Ontario County, is a significant architectural landmark and Whitby’s only provincial historic site marked with a plaque. The school celebrated its 125th anniversary in 1999.

During the Second World War, Whitby was the location of Camp X, a secret spy training facility established by Sir William Stephenson, the “Man Called Intrepid”. Although the buildings have since been demolished, a monument was unveiled on the site of Camp X in 1984 by Ontario’s Lieutenant Governor John Black Aird. Following the War, Soviet dissenter Igor Gouzenko was taken to the facility with his wife to live in secretive protective custody after fleeing Ottawa, Ontario.[3]”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitby,_Ontario

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Ajax newborn photographer

Ajax lifestyle session

Check out these SCRUMPTIOUS twin girls and their big sis in this lifestyle session in their home. Absolutely precious.

 

Life is beautiful. Capture it.

 

Laurel

Ajax photographerNewborn photographer AjaxNewborn photographer AjaxAjax baby photographerNewborn photographer AjaxAjax baby photographerAjax photographerNewborn photographer AjaxAjax baby photographerNewborn photographer AjaxAjax-newborn-photographerNewborn photographer AjaxAjax photographer

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A bit more about Ajax, Ontario

“In 1973, the Town of Ajax conducted a survey of potential transit ridership in Ajax. This led to the creation of Ajax Transit with bus service beginning in 1973 under a contract with Charterways Transportation Limited, which operated service using a fleet of school buses, with heaviest ridership between the Pickering Beach area and downtown Ajax.

In the late 1970s, the town brought the operations in house and began operations on the Elm, Duffins, and Beach routes, which exist to this day. In the early 1980s, the Harwood, Westney Heights, and Village routes began service. Service on the Puckrin route began in the late 1980s.

In 2001, Ajax Transit and the neighbouring Pickering Transit were amalgamated into the Ajax Pickering Transit Authority (APTA), which operated under the joint ownership and oversight of Ajax and Pickering.

In 2006, APTA was amalgamated into Durham Region Transit along with the other municipal transit services in Durham Region.

Road transportation in Ajax is dominated by Highway 401, which runs east–west through the town, dividing it in half. Access to Highway 401 both east and west is available via Westney Road and Salem Road. Only four streets allow transportation from the north end of town to the south end of town by crossing over or under Highway 401. These streets are (from west to east) Church Street, Westney Road, Harwood Avenue and Salem Road. Lakeridge Road crosses the highway, but it is traditionally held to be the border between the towns of Ajax and Whitby. Notable streets that run parallel to the highway are (from north to south) Taunton Road, Rossland Road, Kingston Road (Highway 2) and Bayly Street. At Salem Road is where Highway 401 narrows down to 3 lanes each way causing a severe traffic bottleneck eastbound during rush hours and special holidays due to increase travel to Ottawa and Montreal.

The closest international airport to Ajax is Toronto Pearson International Airport, located 50 kilometres to the west in Mississauga.”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax,_Ontario

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Lifestyle newborn session Ajax

Newborn photographer Ajax

 

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“In 1973, the Town of Ajax conducted a survey of potential transit ridership in Ajax. This led to the creation of Ajax Transit with bus service beginning in 1973 under a contract with Charterways Transportation Limited, which operated service using a fleet of school buses, with heaviest ridership between the Pickering Beach area and downtown Ajax.

In the late 1970s, the town brought the operations in house and began operations on the Elm, Duffins, and Beach routes, which exist to this day. In the early 1980s, the Harwood, Westney Heights, and Village routes began service. Service on the Puckrin route began in the late 1980s.

In 2001, Ajax Transit and the neighbouring Pickering Transit were amalgamated into the Ajax Pickering Transit Authority (APTA), which operated under the joint ownership and oversight of Ajax and Pickering.

In 2006, APTA was amalgamated into Durham Region Transit along with the other municipal transit services in Durham Region.

Road transportation in Ajax is dominated by Highway 401, which runs east–west through the town, dividing it in half. Access to Highway 401 both east and west is available via Westney Road and Salem Road. Only four streets allow transportation from the north end of town to the south end of town by crossing over or under Highway 401. These streets are (from west to east) Church Street, Westney Road, Harwood Avenue and Salem Road. Lakeridge Road crosses the highway, but it is traditionally held to be the border between the towns of Ajax and Whitby. Notable streets that run parallel to the highway are (from north to south) Taunton Road, Rossland Road, Kingston Road (Highway 2) and Bayly Street. At Salem Road is where Highway 401 narrows down to 3 lanes each way causing a severe traffic bottleneck eastbound during rush hours and special holidays due to increase travel to Ottawa and Montreal.

The closest international airport to Ajax is Toronto Pearson International Airport, located 50 kilometres to the west in Mississauga.”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax,_Ontario

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Scarborough Family Photographer

Family Photographer Scarborough

 

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Scarborough (/ˈskɑːrbər/2011 Census 625,698) is an administrative district and former city in TorontoOntarioCanada. Situated atop the Scarborough Bluffs, it occupies the eastern part of the city. Scarborough is contained within the borders of Victoria Park Avenue on the west, Steeles Avenue to the north, Rouge River and the city of Pickering to the east, and Lake Ontario to the south. It was named after the English town of Scarborough, North Yorkshire.

First settled by Europeans in the 1790s, Scarborough has grown from a collection of small rural villages and farms to become fully urbanised with a diverse cultural community. Incorporated in 1850 as a township, Scarborough became part of Metropolitan Toronto in 1953 and was reconstituted as a borough in 1967. Scarborough rapidly developed as a suburb of Old Toronto over the next decade and became a city in 1983. In 1998, Scarborough and the rest of Metropolitan Toronto were amalgamated into the present city of Toronto. Scarborough is an administrative district in Toronto and has its own community council. The Scarborough Civic Centre, the former city hall, is still used by the municipal government of Toronto.

Scarborough is a popular destination for new immigrants in Canada to reside. As a result, it is one of the most diverse and multicultural areas in the Greater Toronto Area, being home to various religious groups and places of worship. It includes some of Toronto’s popular natural landmarks, such as Rouge Park. Scarborough has been declared to be greener than any other part of Toronto.[3]

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarborough%2C_Toronto

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Whitby Family Photographer

Family Photographer Whitby

 

 

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About Whitby, Ontario:

“Whitby is a town in Durham Region. Whitby is located in Southern Ontario east of Ajax and west of Oshawa, on the north shore of Lake Ontario, and is home to the headquarters of Durham Region. It had a population of 128,377[1] at the 2016 census and it is approximately 20 km (12 mi) east of the Toronto borough of Scarborough, and it is known as a commuter suburb in the eastern part of the Greater Toronto Area. While the southern portion of Whitby is predominantly urban and an economic hub, the northern part of the municipality is more rural and includes the communities of AshburnBrooklinMyrtle, and Myrtle Station.

Whitby Township (now the Town of Whitby) was named after the seaport town of Whitby, Yorkshire, England. In addition to Whitby, Yorkshire, the Town of Whitby is also officially twinned with LongueuilQuebec and FeldkirchAustria.

When the township was originally surveyed in 1792, the surveyor, from the northern part of England, named the townships east of Toronto after towns in northeastern England: York, Scarborough, Pickering, Whitby and Darlington.[2] The original name of “Whitby” is Danish, dating from about 867 AD when the Danes invaded Britain. It is a contraction of “Whitteby,” meaning “White Village.” The allusion may be to the white lighthouse on the pier at Whitby, Yorkshire, and also at Whitby, Ontario.’ Although settlement dates back to 1800, it was not until 1836 that a downtown business centre was established by Whitby’s founder Peter Perry.

Whitby’s chief asset was its fine natural harbour on Lake Ontario, from which grain from the farmland to the north was first shipped in 1833. In the 1840s a road was built from Whitby Harbour to Lake Simcoe and Georgian Bay, to bring trade and settlement through the harbour to and from the rich hinterland to the north. The Town of Whitby was chosen as the seat of government for the newly formed County of Ontario in 1852, and incorporated in 1855. The remainder of Whitby Township remained a separate municipality, although the eastern half surrounding Oshawa was incorporated as the new Township of East Whitby in 1857. In the 1870s a railway, the “Port Whitby and Port Perry Railway“, was constructed from Whitby harbour to Port Perry, and later extended to Lindsay as the “Whitby, Port Perry and Lindsay Railway.”

Whitby is also the site of Trafalgar Castle School, a private girls’ school founded in 1874. The building, constructed as an Elizabethan-style castle in 1859–62 as a private residence for the Sheriff of Ontario County, is a significant architectural landmark and Whitby’s only provincial historic site marked with a plaque. The school celebrated its 125th anniversary in 1999.

During the Second World War, Whitby was the location of Camp X, a secret spy training facility established by Sir William Stephenson, the “Man Called Intrepid”. Although the buildings have since been demolished, a monument was unveiled on the site of Camp X in 1984 by Ontario’s Lieutenant Governor John Black Aird. Following the War, Soviet dissenter Igor Gouzenko was taken to the facility with his wife to live in secretive protective custody after fleeing Ottawa.[3]”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitby,_Ontario

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Pickering Family Photographer

Family photographer Pickering

 

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About Pickering, Ontario:

 

“Pickering (2016 population 91,771[1]) is a city located in Southern Ontario, Canada, immediately east of Toronto in Durham Region. It was settled by primarily ethnic British colonists, starting in the 1770s. Many of the smaller rural communities have been preserved and function as provincially significant historic sites and museums.[2]

Early period[edit]

This was Aboriginal territory for thousands of years. The Wyandot (called the Huron by Europeans), who spoke an Iroquoian language, were the historic people living here in the 15th century. Archeological remains of a large village have been found here, known as the Draper Site.[3] Later, the Wyandot moved northwest to Georgian Bay, where they established their historic homeland. There they encountered French explorers in the early 17th century, followed by missionaries and fur traders.

The first recorded history of this area was made in 1669, when French Jesuit missionary François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon noted reaching what he called the Seneca (more likely Onondaga) village of Gandatsetiagon, on the shores of Frenchman’s Bay (for whom it would be named for). The Onondaga (and the Seneca) were among the Five Tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy. The Onondaga (and other Iroquois) generally occupied territory to the south and west of Lakes Ontario and Erie in present-day New York, extending into Pennsylvania and the Ohio Valley, where they maintained hunting grounds. (The Seneca were located farther west, near Seneca Lake among the Finger Lakes. Fenelon wintered at the village and started missionary work with this people.[4])

European settlement[edit]

The British took over Canada following defeat of the French in the Seven Years’ War, known in the North American front as the French and Indian War. They likely completed survey of the township about 1776; British colonial settlers were steadily migrating into the area from eastern areas of Canada.[5] The town was named after Pickering, North Yorkshire.[6]

In the 1813 census, Pickering had 180 residents —40 more than neighbouring Scarborough. A large influx of Quaker immigrants from the eastern United States arrived in the early 1810s.[7] The main thoroughfare at this time was the Kingston Road, which cut through the south of the township on its way from York (now Toronto) east to Kingston.

Pickering was represented in the Mackenzie Rebellion of 1837. One of the leaders, Peter Matthews, had formerly been one of the most prominent members of the community.[8]

Twentieth century[edit]

In 1941, the southeastern portion of the township became the independent town of AjaxOntario County, Ontario became Durham Region in 1974, and some of the town lines were modified. As a result, one of the population centres of the original township, Pickering Village, became part of Ajax, along with its secondary school.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickering%2C_Ontario

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Steam whistle brewery wedding

Such a stunning wedding at The Church of the Blessed Sacrament on Yonge Street followed by a cozy and intimate reception at the Steam Whistle Brewery downtown.

Huge congrats to Kathryn & Isaac, it was such an honour to capture your beautiful day.

 

 

 

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About Steam Whistle Brewery:

 

“Steam Whistle Brewing is a brewery in Toronto. The company produces a premium pilsner lager packaged in distinctive green glass bottles and a non-twist cap. They only use four natural ingredients: spring water from Caledon, Ontario; hops from Czech Republic and Germany; two-row barley; and yeast. In 2004, Steam Whistle Pilsner was voted best beer in Toronto at the Golden Tap Awards. Steam Whistle has also been voted Best Toronto Microbrewery by the readers of NOWEye Weekly and XPress in Ottawa.

The three founders are former employees of Upper Canada Brewing Company before it was bought by Sleeman’s. The original name for the beer was going to be “Three Fired Guys Brewing Company” since they were all fired from Upper Canada Brewing Company when it was purchased by Sleeman; however, they chose Steam Whistle Brewing to evoke an image of steam rushing from a factory’s whistle signaling the end of the work day. Embossed at the bottom of Steam Whistle bottles is “3FG” as an inside joke, referencing “Three Fired Guys”.

The first batch of bottled Steam Whistle pilsner rolled off the line onto market on May 24, 2000

Steam Whistle beer is sold in Ontario at The Beer Store and the LCBO as well as at bars and restaurants. Steam Whistle is also available throughout Alberta and British Columbia at retailers, bars, and restaurants. Steam Whistle is currently in the process of packaging their beer in cans as a means of further penetrating the western Canadian market.

In April 29, 2015, Steam Whistle introduced 6 packs into the Nova Scotia market.

The brewery occupies Bays 1-14 within a building known as the John Street Roundhouse at Roundhouse Park. Built in 1929, it was previously the home of a Canadian Pacific Railway steam locomotive repair facility, and operated as such until May 13, 1988. The John Street Roundhouse is designated a National Historic Site, and is owned by the City of Toronto. It is located within walking distance of the Rogers Centre and the CN Tower. A similar roundhouse, the CNR Spadina Roundhouse, was torn down to make way for the SkyDome (now Rogers Centre).

The brewery also hosts regular tours of its facility, as well as “Steam Whistle Unsigned”, a monthly concert series of local independent bands.

The company operates the annual Steam Whistle’s Roundhouse Winter Craft Beer Festival (RHCBF). In 2017, the event (February 11) celebrates its fourth year. Plans were to include over 40 Ontario craft breweries and cideries and a special selection of beers from Alberta Small Brewers.[1]”

Take from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_Whistle_Brewing

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Ajax family photographer

Family photographer Ajax

 

Ajax family photographer: absolutely perfect weather for this stunning fall session with this lovely family

 

Life is beautiful. Capture it.

 

Laurel

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Health care[edit]

The Ajax and Pickering General Hospital first opened in 1954 with 38 adult and children’s beds. It was expanded to 50 beds in 1958 and a major expansion to 127 beds took place in 1964. The emergency and outpatient services were expanded in 1975. The large growth of population in the Town has prompted a further expansion. Approval was granted in the fall of 1990 to further expand. In 1999, the Hospital merged with Centenary Health Centre in Scarborough to become part of the Rouge Valley Health System. Construction on a $60 million expansion began in 2007, although that has been marred by the highly controversial closure of the 3 West Mental Health ward in 2008, which was originally to be part of the expansion.

Emergency services[edit]

Ajax is policed by the Durham Regional Police from a station in Pickering. Ambulance/emergency medical services are provided by Durham Region. Ajax Fire & Emergency Services provides firefighting services from three fire stations.

Transportation[edit]

In 1973, the Town of Ajax conducted a survey of potential transit ridership in Ajax. This led to the creation of Ajax Transit with bus service beginning in 1973 under a contract with Charterways Transportation Limited, which operated service using a fleet of school buses, with heaviest ridership between the Pickering Beach area and downtown Ajax.

In the late 1970s, the town brought the operations in house and began operations on the Elm, Duffins, and Beach routes, which exist to this day. In the early 1980s, the Harwood, Westney Heights, and Village routes began service. Service on the Puckrin route began in the late 1980s.

In 2001, Ajax Transit and the neighbouring Pickering Transit were amalgamated into the Ajax Pickering Transit Authority (APTA), which operated under the joint ownership and oversight of Ajax and Pickering.

In 2006, APTA was amalgamated into Durham Region Transit along with the other municipal transit services in Durham Region.

Road transportation in Ajax is dominated by Highway 401, which runs east–west through the town, dividing it in half. Access to Highway 401 both east and west is available via Westney Road and Salem Road. Only four streets allow transportation from the north end of town to the south end of town by crossing over or under Highway 401. These streets are (from west to east) Church Street, Westney Road, Harwood Avenue and Salem Road. Lakeridge Road crosses the highway, but it is traditionally held to be the border between the towns of Ajax and Whitby. Notable streets that run parallel to the highway are (from north to south) Taunton Road, Rossland Road, Kingston Road (Highway 2) and Bayly Street. At Salem Road is where Highway 401 narrows down to 3 lanes each way causing a severe traffic bottleneck eastbound during rush hours and special holidays due to increase travel to Ottawa and Montreal.

The closest international airport to Ajax is Toronto Pearson International Airport, located 50 kilometres to the west in Mississauga.”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax,_Ontario#Local_government

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Newborn photographer Ajax

Ajax newborn photographer

 

Newborn photographer Ajax: I always love having my little “rent-a-babies” in studio. I get to have awesome cuddles with these precious munchkins and then send them home with mom and dad (who do not get to sleep through the night).

 

Check out this little dude, an absolute sweetheart.

 

Best,

Laurel

 

Life is beautiful. Capture it.

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“Today, Ajax is commonly considered part of the Greater Toronto Area, in the eastern part of the Golden Horseshoe region.

As is true for most suburban areas in the Greater Toronto Area, Ajax has grown considerably since the 1980s. What was once a small town mostly surrounded by agricultural areas has increasingly become a bedroom community to Toronto and its environs. Many residents commute to work in Toronto or other municipalities in Durham Region.

The following is a summary of major changes in the past several decades:

  • Recent rapid low density population growth. Only one greenfield area of the Town remains, located in the north western corner of the town. As the town becomes increasingly built-out, the town is attempting to increase intensity of development, particularly in the downtown area near Harwood Avenue north of Bayly. However, development in Ajax still principally consists of single-family detachedhouses on separate lots, and so the fundamental nature of the town seems fixed for the near future. Recently, these areas have expanded to north Ajax. the reason is the large amount of land that can be capitalized on for housing investment. Although these projects have been going on for many years, until recently these homes have been constructed and citizens have now been residing in these homes. this has ultimately contributed to the population increase in Ajax.
  • The town’s very auto dependent urban form, as well as that of its neighbour municipalities, has resulted in steady increases in traffic congestion with few realistic alternatives to automobile travel. There are long-term plans to widen regional roads and Highway 401, extend Highway 407, but this essentially represents status quo development. Increases in Durham Region Transit service, ongoing efforts to improve cycling and walking conditions, and the above noted intensification initiatives may alleviate this to some degree.
  • Increasing multiculturalism, with many young ethnic professionals moving into the newer northern parts of Ajax. These northern parts of Ajax namely consist of Rossland Road and Taunton Road. Given the large number of homes being built in the area for the last few years, this newer complex is home to plazas and sports recreational facilities. Summer camps and soccer clubs often find these recreational areas worthwhile given the new field and its aesthetic majesty. Parks are also built on this area and are mostly located in or nearby recreational facilities.”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax,_Ontario#Geography

Muskoka wedding photographer
L~ F~:

Ajax wedding photographer

Wedding photographer Ajax

 

 

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“Today, Ajax is commonly considered part of the Greater Toronto Area, in the eastern part of the Golden Horseshoe region.

As is true for most suburban areas in the Greater Toronto Area, Ajax has grown considerably since the 1980s. What was once a small town mostly surrounded by agricultural areas has increasingly become a bedroom community to Toronto and its environs. Many residents commute to work in Toronto or other municipalities in Durham Region.

The following is a summary of major changes in the past several decades:

  • Recent rapid low density population growth. Only one greenfield area of the Town remains, located in the north western corner of the town. As the town becomes increasingly built-out, the town is attempting to increase intensity of development, particularly in the downtown area near Harwood Avenue north of Bayly. However, development in Ajax still principally consists of single-family detachedhouses on separate lots, and so the fundamental nature of the town seems fixed for the near future. Recently, these areas have expanded to north Ajax. the reason is the large amount of land that can be capitalized on for housing investment. Although these projects have been going on for many years, until recently these homes have been constructed and citizens have now been residing in these homes. this has ultimately contributed to the population increase in Ajax.
  • The town’s very auto dependent urban form, as well as that of its neighbour municipalities, has resulted in steady increases in traffic congestion with few realistic alternatives to automobile travel. There are long-term plans to widen regional roads and Highway 401, extend Highway 407, but this essentially represents status quo development. Increases in Durham Region Transit service, ongoing efforts to improve cycling and walking conditions, and the above noted intensification initiatives may alleviate this to some degree.
  • Increasing multiculturalism, with many young ethnic professionals moving into the newer northern parts of Ajax. These northern parts of Ajax namely consist of Rossland Road and Taunton Road. Given the large number of homes being built in the area for the last few years, this newer complex is home to plazas and sports recreational facilities. Summer camps and soccer clubs often find these recreational areas worthwhile given the new field and its aesthetic majesty. Parks are also built on this area and are mostly located in or nearby recreational facilities.”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax,_Ontario

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Ajax Family Photographer

Family photographer Ajax

I spent an absolutely perfect fall evening with this gorgeous family. You are absolutely going to love the love here…they are all so sweet together.

 

Life is beautiful. Capture it.

Laurel

 

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“The 2006 Canadian Census[14] reported Ajax’s population at 90,167 which was a significant 22.3% increase over 2001 numbers and almost 3½ times the 6.6% population increase average for Ontario during that same period. This brought Ajax’s population density to 1,344 people per square kilometre residing in approximately 28,616 occupied private dwellings. The median age of 35.4 was significantly lower than Toronto’s median age of 37.5, Ontario’s median age of 39.0, or Canada’s median age of 39.5 years old when the overall Ajax population included 22.6% under 15 years of age and 8% aged 65 years and over.

94% of Ajax’s population were Canadian citizens with 11.4% being recent immigrants (from 1991 to 2006) including 3.5% having arrived within the preceding 5 years (since 2001). Of the Ajax population 15 years of age and over, which represent 77% of Ajax’s total population, 38.8% immigrated to Canada, 23.3% were born in Canada to one or both parents having been born outside of Canada, and 37.9% were born inside Canada to both parents being Canadian born (and possibly their grandparents as well).

Ajax’s racial make up at that time consisted of: White (63.6%), Black (13%), South Asian (10.8%), Southeast & East Asian (5.7%), West Asian & Arab (2.1%), and Aboriginal (0.8%). 1.7% of the population was multiracial, and the last 2.4% belong to another group.

According to the Community Profiles from the 2006 Census,[14] English was the mother tongue of 79.3% of the population, French was the mother tongue of 1.5%, English/French bilingualism was mother tongue for 0.2%, and the mother tongue of the remaining 19% was an other non-official language either by itself or combined with English, French, or both or with another non-official language.

For those aged 25 to 64 years, the highest levels of education were 64.1% with a post-secondary degree, 26.4% with a high school diploma (or equivalent) and 9.5% had no certificate, diploma or degree.

The unemployment rate in Ajax was 6.4%, which was equal to the Ontario rate, but the employment rate of 69.7% was significantly higher than the Ontario average of 62.8%. The median personal income was $33,026 for persons 15 and over ($28,885 after tax) compared to the Ontario figures of $27,258 income ($24,604 after tax); median household income (2005) was $81,940 ($68,527 after taxes), which was significantly higher than either the Ontario median household income (2005) at $60,455 ($52,117 after taxes) or the Canadian average at $53,634 ($46,584).”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax%2C_Ontario

 

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Scarborough wedding photographer

Scarborough engagement session

 

Scarborough wedding photographer:

 

 

 

 

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Here is a little bit more information about Scarborough:

Scarborough (/ˈskɑːrbər/2011 Census 625,698) is an administrative district and former city in TorontoOntarioCanada. Situated atop the Scarborough Bluffs, it occupies the eastern part of the city. Scarborough is contained within the borders of Victoria Park Avenue on the west, Steeles Avenue to the north, Rouge River and the city of Pickering to the east, and Lake Ontario to the south. It was named after the English town of Scarborough, North Yorkshire.

First settled by Europeans in the 1790s, Scarborough has grown from a collection of small rural villages and farms to become fully urbanised with a diverse cultural community. Incorporated in 1850 as a township, Scarborough became part of Metropolitan Toronto in 1953 and was reconstituted as a borough in 1967. Scarborough rapidly developed as a suburb of Old Toronto over the next decade and became a city in 1983. In 1998, Scarborough and the rest of Metropolitan Toronto were amalgamated into the present city of Toronto. Scarborough is an administrative district in Toronto and has its own community council. The Scarborough Civic Centre, the former city hall, is still used by the municipal government of Toronto.

Scarborough is a popular destination for new immigrants in Canada to reside. As a result, it is one of the most diverse and multicultural areas in the Greater Toronto Area, being home to various religious groups and places of worship. It includes some of Toronto’s popular natural landmarks, such as Rouge Park. Scarborough has been declared to be greener than any other part of Toronto.[3]”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarborough,_Toronto

 

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Ganaraska Forest Wedding

I cannot say enough about this Ganaraska Forest wedding….ABSOLUTELY STUNNING! There are so many reasons why I love what I do, but one of them is that my job introduces me to these hidden gems throughout Ontario. Sooooo many more photos to come but in the mean time, here is a taste of Kim and Andrew’s perfect fall wedding.

Many thanks to the other vendors who made this day so beautiful:

Venue: http://www.ganaraskaforestcentre.ca/

Video: http://www.infinitedigital.ca

Wedding Planning: http://www.rsdevents.com

Dj:  http://www.djmastermix.ca

 

 

 

 

 

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“The Ganaraska Forest Centre is a multi-use facility, located in the heart of the 11,000-acre Ganaraska Forest. Featuring overnight accommodations for over 80 people, the facility boasts a large Great Hall, four break-out classrooms, a commercial kitchen and expert culinary staff to look after any group’s dietary needs.

The certified teachers at the Ganaraska Forest Centre offer over 25 Ontario curriculum-linked outdoor educational opportunities to students in Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12, through day-use programming, or 2, 3, 4 or 5-day residential stays. The Ganaraska Forest Centres outdoor education programs meet or exceed the criteria of the Ontario Physical and Health Education Association’s (OPHEA) Safety Guidelines. All instructors are Ontario-certified teachers, with outdoor education emphasis, and combined, have several years of practical, hands-on teaching experience.  The facility is also available for private and corporate events and community and non-profit groups.

The Ganaraska Forest Centre is a fully accessible site, with users having access to an All Terrain Wheelchair, for those with mobility issues.”

Sourced: http://www.ganaraskaforestcentre.ca

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Port Hope Photographer

Port Hope Engagement session

Ontario barn wedding

 

Port Hope Photographer: I had so much fun at this romantic barn engagement session in Port Hope, Ontario. Here are some of my favourites from their shoot.

 

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Port Hope is a municipality in Southern OntarioCanada, about 109 kilometres (68 mi) east of Toronto and about 159 kilometres (99 mi) west of Kingston. It is located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River on the north shore of Lake Ontario, in the west end of Northumberland County. Port Hope’s nearest urban neighbour (7 km to the east) is the Town of Cobourg, while between them and surrounding Cobourg is the Township of Hamilton. Since 1868, the town has been home to Trinity College School (previously located in WestonOntario).

Ganaraska was attributed to the area by the First Nations natives of the region and is what they called the river that flows through the town. The name originates from Ganaraske, the Cayuga village first located at the current townsite. The Cayuga, part of the Iroquois Confederacy, had migrated there from New York in 1779, after suffering extensive damage as British allies at their homeland in New York state during the American Revolution.

In 1793, United Empire Loyalists became the first permanent settlers of European heritage in Port Hope, which they called Smith’s Creek after a former fur trader. Mills and a town plot were developing by the turn of the century. After the War of 1812, more British settlers were wanted, and a better name was required. After a brief fling with the name Toronto, the village was renamed in 1817 as Port Hope, after the Township of Hope of which it was a part, which in turn had been named for Colonel Henry Hope, lieutenant governor of the Province of Quebec.[3] In 1834 Port Hope was incorporated as a town.

Relatively slow growth from 1881 to 1951 resulted in much of the town’s original architecture not being demolished in the name of progress. Port Hope’s downtown is celebrated now as the best-preserved 19th-century streetscape in Ontario. The town’s local chapter of the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario and the Heritage Port Hope Advisory Committee are very active and advise on the restoration and preservation of architecturally or historically significant buildings. With over 270 heritage-designated buildings throughout the municipality, Port Hope has a higher per capita rate of preservation than any other town or city in Canada. Downtown businesses are regulated by the municipality to maintain the town’s unique character.

On January 1, 2001, the original town amalgamated with Hope Township to form the Municipality of Port Hope and Hope, which was renamed to its current name in November of that same year. Prior to amalgamation, the town’s census population was listed as 11,718 while the township’s was 3,877.”

Sourced from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Hope,_Ontario

 

Muskoka wedding photographer
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Algonquin Park Wedding

Algonquin Park Engagement

Lookout Trail, Algonquin Park

Muskoka wedding photographer

 

Algonquin Park wedding: When Lookout Point in Algonquin Park is on your bucket list and your client asks you if you are willing to drive there, YOU SAY YES and haul your family along for the day trip.

Absolutely stunning views, I highly recommend it. Lookout Point is a 15 minute hike up with wide trails that will leave you a bit winded but totally manageable. You will need a park pass ($20) to park without getting a ticket and try to get there earlier in the day to avoid the tour bus crowds. These photos were taken Thanksgiving weekend 2017.

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Here is a bit of information about Lookout Point:

“The Lookout Trail is likely the most popular day hike trail in Algonquin Park. The trail climbs steeply to a lookout with a spectacular view. The trail has recently been “upgraded” and is now a hard-packed gravel trail throughout the 1.9km loop trail. Having hiked the trail before the “upgrade” I can tell you that the trail was much better before. However, it is likely that trail erosion was becoming a problem wih the number of hikers of this popular trail. The trail to and from the the lookout is not that special. After the lookout the trail descends quickly back to the trailhead. This is a trail that I never miss when visiting Algonquin. A great hike if you have an hour to spare.

Directions:

he Lookout Trail is located at kilometre 40 on Highway 60 which crosses the southern part of Algonquin Park.”

Sourced from: http://trailpeak.com/trail-Lookout-Trail-near-Algonquin-Park-ON-7077

 

Muskoka wedding photographer
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